Resolution Progress 2017: Third Quarter

(Original ; First Quarter ; Half ; Third-Quarter ; Final)

For the third quarter, I should have progressed about 75%. So, let’s see where I am.

TED Talk: How To Ask Good Questions

Why ask questions? Sometimes being able to ask a good question is more important than finding a good answer.

If the video above does not work, then try How To Ask Good Questions: David Stork at TEDxStanleyPark

What makes a question the best?

  • Clearly stated and unambiguous
  • There must be a solution
  • Solution method exists
  • Improved solution methods will likely be useful
  • Extremal
  • Goes to hear of issue
  • The “right” level
  • Leads to new questions

General techniques

  • Isolate components
  • Consider all attributes and combinations of attributes
  • Explore missing aspects
  • Consider extereme cases
  • How does X depend on Y?
  • How to measure?
  • Transisitions from state 1 to state 2
  • Invert things
  • Who, what, where, why, when?
  • Analogies
  • Different “languages” (math, code)
  • Different disciplines

How wide was the Equifax data breach?

143 million US consumers were caught up in the data breach. I keep seeing it portrayed as 44% of the US population. But, the US population includes children.

Initially, it seemed to me the better metric was 11 million more than all of 2016 IRS tax filers. The problems with this latter comparison? Lots of people who file taxes might not have a credit history and some with credit histories might not file taxes in a specific year. Which brings up taxes for a specific year comparing against people who had a credit history across many years is sketchy.

Other statistics give me headaches too.

  • The US Census’ latest 2016 estimate is that there were 325M (million) people in the country. The original 44% statistic is based on that.
  • The US Census’ latest 2016 estimate is that there were 249M adults in the country. That brings the percentage up to 57%.
  • The Bureau of Labor Statistics says in July 2017 when the hack occurred, there were 160M members of the civilian noninstitutionalized population. That excludes inmates and members of the armed forces most of whom probably have credit histories.

So, I took the BLS 160M and looked up the excluded populations.

  • It looks like there were about 1.5M in the prisons.
  • And there is about 1.4M active military.

Combining these, it looks like about 88% of people in the “potentially have worked population” were affected.

I feel good with the 88% number.

Really, though, everyone probably has had their SSN and birthday exposed.  If you have ever attended a K-12 school, post-secondary education, gotten insurance, gone to a doctor, engaged in any way with a financial institution, or given your SSN to a government entity, then you should assume that your personal information is ready to be exposed at any time. Nor should you rely on being told. The state of Georgia exposed every voter’s SSN to subscribers of the voting list by accident and notified no one because they felt the CDs being returned meant no one could have the info. (Because the subscribers could not have copied the files off the discs.)

Overuse of SSNs

The overuse of the Social Security Number bothers me.

Healthcare providers use the SSN. They all want it, so they all have it in their files and databases. Given the push to move records to electronic form, they all have it recorded in databases. This makes them tempting targets for fraudsters. They have to use the strongest security practices to protect the data which also makes working with it more difficult which leads to shortcuts that make them more vulnerable.

From Bruce Schneier,

It’s not just Equifax. It might be one of the biggest, but there are 2,500 to 4,000 other data brokers that are collecting, storing, and selling information about you — almost all of them companies you’ve never heard of and have no business relationship with.

He goes on to talk about how companies are tracking our moves online and tying it to their profiles of our identity.

If my financial account (like a credit card number) is compromised, then the bank’s solution is to close the bad account and open a clean one for me. If my Social Security Number is compromised, then my solution is to closely monitor the opening of accounts using it. Getting a new SSN is very difficult because unlike a financial account, the number is my unique identifier.

Personally, I think the fine for a healthcare entity getting breached should be $100 per account. So, Anthem’s 2017 breach of 18,000 members would cost it $1,800,000. Anthem’s 2015 breach of 78.8 million would cost it $7.88 billion. (They got a fine of $115 million or about $1.50 per account.)

 

Acknowledgement

Trying to get a price quote from a vendor. It has been two full weeks. The first week plus was confusion within their organization who should be working on it. See, back in April they reclassified our account, so we got a different representative, which is fine. But four months later, they should not be repeatedly trying to have the old one work on the quote. Only when the old one realized that we were not his client did it get shifted to the correct person.

However, three days since then I just realized that I have not seen anything from our representative that he is in indeed aware of the quote, confirming what is supposed to be in the quote, or providing the estimated time it should take to provide us a quote.

Hopefully, I am not a narcissist, but this lack of acknowledgment made me nervous the request had been overlooked. After yet another poke of the vendor, we did finally get a quote. Overall, it was two weeks, one hour, 28 minutes later after the initial request. I hate to nag, but I also hate to allow the request to be overlooked. The acknowledgment lets me know the fulfiller knows about it and it not being done is due to something else.

Collected Quotes 2017-SEP-01

Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.
— Anaïs Nin (via thepowerwithin)

Staying true to yourself is not about staying the same. It’s not about making a goal to be the exact individual whom you were since day one. Staying true means expressing what you think, feel, and value; regardless of when in your life it arises. You may not be the exact same person who you used to be, however that’s completely natural. You have simply grown and deepened your self image since then.
— Nicole Addison (via thepowerwithin)

Enlightened Empathy

At the time AirBNB was so small, Joe Gebbia personally went to listers to photograph homes for the listings. In taking these photos…

“We got so close that we go to step into their shoes for a moment and see the world through their eyes, and really see the pain points that they were feeling,” says Gebbia. That’s the basis of innovation — you take an enlightened and empathetic point of view and combine it with your own unique point of view to create something new. In a short period of time, the quality of listings improved and number of options increased.

In the How I Built This with Guy Raz podcast, Gebbia calls this Enlightened Empathy.

While doing web design, we talked to the administrators for the department who wanted a site. In doing support for the sites, I would get to talk to users to understand what they were trying to accomplish and make tweaks or major re-designs to make that experience better.

There is a whole profession, User Experience Designer, built around the idea of engaging representative users to understand how they use technology to ensure the design reflects how people will use it.

TED Talk: The surprising habits of original thinkers

I loved Adam Grant’s book, Originals. The below video is essentially the TL;DR version.

How do creative people come up with great ideas? Organizational psychologist Adam Grant studies “originals”: thinkers who dream up new ideas and take action to put them into the world. In this talk, learn three unexpected habits of originals — including embracing failure. “The greatest originals are the ones who fail the most, because they’re the ones who try the most,” Grant says. “You need a lot of bad ideas in order to get a few good ones.”

If the above video does not work, then try The surprising habits of original thinkers.

On Monuments

We built monuments to display our pride of winning or mourn our loss. They represent what we considered the great things about our society in the past as lessons for the present and future. In that light, defacing a historical marker such as both of Emmett Till’s shows the opposition that honoring the person is a good thing.

Frankly, I think we as a country have done a terrible job recognizing important people and events. Confederate monuments are overly honored due to the rush to throw them up during Segregation and opposing the Civil Rights Movement.

We should do a better job today creating monuments to abolitionists, slave rebellions, and victims of Jim Crow lynchings. People should be able to recognize Frederick Douglass, Nat Turner, and Emmett Till even better than they recognize the faces of traitorous generals and presidents like Lee and Davis.