New Page: Teeshirts

I'm blogging this
I'm blogging this.

I added a new page, Teeshirts, to this site. It joins my other pages: ReadingAbout Me, and Quotes to Make You Think. It documents my teeshirt collection from sites like Thinkgeek, Woot, and Threadless.

Yes, I already track my shirts with photos tagged with the term “teeshirt” on Flickr or Teeshirts I Own Pinterest board. Unfortunately, people do not seem to use Flickr much anymore. So much like Reading which is a page on my blog duplicating what I am doing with Goodreads, I’ll occasionally update the local blog version.

Information Diet

Do we consume too much information? I might. Lately I have thought about reducing the amount of following I do. Typically I hit this point when I realize it takes me all weekend to catch up. To be fair I reach this point by getting all caught up over a long weekend and seeking out new stuff.

  • 40% the blog or news feeds (over 100),
  • 40% Facebook friends (remove over 250),
  • 40% Tumblr following, (remove 45),
  • 40% Twitter following (remove 100),

Then there are the potential stoppages:

  • Stop following tags on WordPress.com, Tumblr, Blogspot, Flickr.
  • Stop using some social media sites entirely like Google+ or Diaspora.

Given my social preferences, I have lots of time to spend online.

Goal accounting

Here is the progress made on my 2010 New Year’s Resolutions.

  • Read 12,000 pages. At last count, I was on track to succeed with this one.
  • Learn to cook 20 new dishes. FAILED. Made only 10.
  • Participate in Project 365. FAILED. I made it to February before I gave up on it.
  • Have fun now not later. SUCCESS. Went to more events people invited me to attend than the previous four or five years combined.

What is interesting is the more others talked about my goals, the stronger I pushed on them. So a good goal is one others hold interest in me completing?

Cooking and reading were somewhat incompatible. Cooking is a home activity. I do not read very well at home as computers, television, and any number of things distract me. Failing it was a calculated decision so that I would meet a more important goal.

Library Netflix Model

I tend to buy books. As Heather pointed out on Flickr, I could save lots of money by checking books out from the library. I don’t for one big reason. I am lazy. Most of my purchases fall within a sweet spot of wanting to read more about something because I heard about it on the radio, saw a television episode on a topic, read something in another book, or talked to someone about it. My memory is poor so I only buy a book if I happen to hit the bookstore prior to forgetting. For most of these that means Amazon. To get a book from a library would be mean remembering to go there AND the book I wanted which is unlikely.

However, books sit on my shelf for sometimes years before I get around to reading them. I also tend to read several at a time which slows my pace on any particular book to about 250 pages a month unless I devote more time to it.

Netflix works similarly for me. I add things to the queue and maybe eventually get around to getting the disk. I’ll watch a disk a week maybe. Netflix’s Watch Instantly is much better for me as I can pick whatever I want off the list and see it then. Even then I might watch half and watch the rest later. I’m watching 3x more with the Watch Instantly model than I did off the DVD model.

While I would like an eBook Reader, I don’t find the purchase model compelling.  Take the Netflix concepts of:

  • A watch instantly queue (more a list of everything I am interested in watching)
  • When I am ready to read it downloads to my device.
  • When I am finished, I no longer have access.
  • Do not limit me to one out at a time.
  • A monthly charge for the privilege of all of the above.

With that kind of model, I would be willing to buy a Kindle, Nook, Kobo, or whatever for anytime access to an enormous library of books. They could even charge me $10-15 depending on how many I can have out a time.

Scott Kelby’s 3rd Annual Worldwide Photo Walk

Just like I went on the walk last year, I went on the Scott Kelby worldwide photo walk in Athens this year yesterday. One local called us the paparazzi. Another asked if there was a photographer convention.

A couple of my takes:

Sunset Crane Founders Garden

Flickr Groups featuring photos from Athens and other walks:

Clinton and the Tree


Clinton and the Tree

Originally uploaded by Ezra S F

We really wanted this tree in the photo. The problems: 1) illuminating the tree enough, 2) not over exposing Clinton, 3) hand holding the flash and trigger. Cranked the power up to full power. Wes aimed it at the tree. Clinton is essentially just getting the leftover light.

Strobist: Sunpak MZ-440AF-CA full power shot through 60 inch umbrella. Triggered by a pair of PocketWizard PLUS II.

Become a fan of Athens Strobist on Facebook.

Protected Post Password

I imported all my LiveJournal posts here. Other than posting pictures to there from Flickr, I don’t really use LJ anymore. I rarely even read my friends’ blogs there. Too bad. I still have the teeshirt.

Most of my LJ posts are protected. For this site, I’d rather have them set to private. So the section of WordPress (Tools > Import > LiveJournal) saying this seemed relevant:

If you have any entries on LiveJournal which are marked as private, they will be password-protected when they are imported so that only people who know the password can see them.

If you don’t enter a password, ALL ENTRIES from your LiveJournal will be imported as public posts in WordPress.

Password protected seemed better than not, so I set a 30 character long password, and the form accepted all 30. When the password didn’t work, I logged in as the administrator user and looked at Publish > Visibility >

In my opinion, web forms in general should prevent the user from entering more characters than the application or database will take. Passwords are very exact, so forms for creating them definitely should not allow extraneous characters.