Stores Tracking Me Could Be More Helpful

I know the stores track my purchases. They have tons of data on each of us. Their apps and rewards cards are precisely for knowing who I am and tracking me.

The other day, my girlfriend asked me to buy something using her rewards card to push it over the $1 she was short to get the reward for that month . (It is one of those you have to cross the threshold within the month or you lose the points.) There was a small temptation to mess with that data by buying something she’d never normally get. Instead, I bought something she would normally buy. I also paid in cash to keep my card number from being associated with her.

I just feel these companies with apps could be doing things to enable me to spend more in their stores.

  1. Their profile knows my purchasing frequency. They should be able to predict fairly well when my next purchase ought to happen. For items that happen monthly or less frequent, they could send me an email or app notification reminder. This value-add to the service would earn my loyalty in buying from them for helping me remember.
    • Of course, if they get it routinely wrong and alert me after I’ve already bought it from them, then I will be so offended that I would look for alternatives.
  2. Their profile knows how much I am willing to pay for specific items. They should be able to predict for which items I am willing pay full versus only sale prices. Then notify me when the items I buy for sale prices are available at close to the cost I am willing to pay.
    • Naturally, if they want to keep quiet when the item is significantly lower than what I am willing to pay, then I abstractly understand. That means in the moment of figuring it out, I would be hurt but as long as it is just a concept the decision makes sense.
    • They could also offer to let me set a price threshold for alerts when the item is offered for less than that amount. That would be useful pricing data for them.

 

New Outlook

New Glasses Yesterday, I bought new glasses. Its not much of a change, really. Black wire rims. The arms are thicker and more plastic. Its the same professional look I was sporting with the last pair, but the lenses are smaller and closer to my eyes. The nose pieces ride higher on my nose.

I likey.

As I have with every new pair of glasses, I can see things much more clearly. Of course, I’d probably be better by getting a new pair of glasses more frequently. Heck, I could never get the last pair clean because the anti-glare coating had eroded.

Something I noticed about shopping for glasses is most are horrendous. Now, I don’t know much about designers. Some brands seemed familiar from shopping for cologne? Do people really buy this crap? I went into the store with a list of possibilities. Interestingly, the storedidn’t have them organized in such a way as to make it easy to find them. Doh!

Elizabeth, the sales associate was pleasant and helpful. She picked up that I kind of knew what I wanted and avoided pushiness. A 180 from all the other times I gotten glasses.

BYOB

I may have to go to an IKEA store just to show my support. The plastic bags I hate. The paper bags I hate. This is awesome.

Attention Shoppers: Bring Your Own Bag – Newsweek: Tip Sheet Environment – MSNBC.com:

Apparently BYOB translates a little differently in Sweden. At least for IKEA, the privately held assemble-it-yourself furniture chain and Swedish-meatball purveyor, the acronym now means “bring your own bag.” Beginning March 15, all of its U.S. stores will start charging five cents for each plastic bag that customers take their purchases home in. The idea is to encourage the masses to bring their own bags with an eye toward reducing litter—an explicit reminder that what was once free to the customer did not necessarily come without a greater cost.