Illusory Truth Effect

Repeated statements receive higher truth ratings than new statements, a phenomenon called the illusory truth effect… Repetition makes statements easier to process (i.e., fluent) relative to new statements, leading people to the (sometimes) false conclusion that they are more truthful… Indeed, illusory truth effects arise even without prior exposure—people rate statements presented in high-contrast (i.e., easy-to-read) fonts… Continue reading Illusory Truth Effect

Wrap Up #USGRockEagle13

Now that I am back at work… And apparently was photographed and did not know it… WordPress.com’s Jetpack publish feature pushed my prior Rock Eagle related posts about sessions I attended to some of my social media presences. Guess I could +1 them for Google Plus? Looks like the last time I blogged as much… Continue reading Wrap Up #USGRockEagle13

Introvert Myths

This Huffington Post piece, 6 Things You Thought Wrong About Introverts is not terrible. It covers these myths about introverts. All introverts are shy — and all shy people are introverts. Introverts don’t like to be around people. (Anti-social) Introverts don’t make good leaders or public speakers. Introverts have more negative personalities. (Depression) Introverts are more… Continue reading Introvert Myths

Cheating

In yesterday’s Underground Back Channel post, I wrote: Because students are engaging in forbidden activity these conversations are underground. Well, the smart ones. Some are having these conversations on Twitter where one party of the conversation is not private and anyone (like a nosy DBA like myself) can see it. If they are used to… Continue reading Cheating

Underground Back Channels

During first couple years at my first real job post-college, a friend of a friend would IM me questions about how to solve computer problems for which he could not figure out the answers. These requests started as me doing the work for him with dubious promises of doing the same for me. (I knew… Continue reading Underground Back Channels

USG Annual Computing Conference

Some of you may have noticed me posting on Twitter using the #usgre10 hashtag. This was the recommended tag to use when posting about the conference. In talking to a director at a university in the University System of Georgia, he said something interesting which had been said to my CIO, “More good for the… Continue reading USG Annual Computing Conference

Another Ironic Keynote

Earlier today, Blackboard announced the keynote will be given by Anya Kamenetz, author of DIY U as the DevCon keynote. It continues the tradition of ironic keynote speakers in even years: 2008 Michael Wesch who spoke on how the traditional one-to-many classroom model isn’t good for helping students learn. The two LMS products Blackboard makes… Continue reading Another Ironic Keynote

I’m blogging this.

For about eight months I have participated in a group called the Brunch Bunch here in Athens. We get together to eat and talk. Many conversations drift into the nerdy (my forté?). The locations vary so I have gotten to try new (to me) restaurants. Elizabeth (pictured right) vouched that I am a great guy.… Continue reading I’m blogging this.

The Twitter Timesink

Glenn asked: “What is it about Twitter that makes it more of a time sink than Facebook?” I consider a time sink something where I invest a high value of time for boring and poor value. My contacts mostly duplicate in Twitter what they provide in Facebook. The time I spend reading Twitter posts I’ve… Continue reading The Twitter Timesink