Category: Psychology

  • TED Talk: What frogs in hot water can teach us about thinking again

    This one is a nutshell for Adam Grant’s newest book, Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don’t Know. I loved the book. I encourage everyone to read it. I’ve long strived for confident humility. I love that he names this talk after the myth of the frog in a slowly boiling pot. Frogs […]

  • Opposite of face blindness?

    Face blindness means that I would not recognize individuals I know. Clothing, voice, or other cues would be the only way to know person A from B. I keep thinking new people I see look like a close relative of an acquaintance. I am not confusing them with the person. Just wondering if they are […]

  • The Bystander Effect

    I am seeing more and more where people are complaining about the filming of an attack and not intervening in it. People are claiming they would do something. But… I suspect many of the people who film these events without intervening think beforehand they would do something too. Why they do not intervene is pretty […]

  • Trump’s best shot at reelection is false-consensus effect

    Thinking back to Obama’s campaign for reelection, I recall much talk about how incompetent, evil, and terrible a president he was from his opposition. Not Romney directly but the his likely voters on social media. To the point of Romney feeling moral obligation to defend Obama as not that bad of a person to his […]

  • What I’ve learned over the past year

    A friend asked me this last night and my unprepared answer was all over the place, but I think in retrospect there was a theme. I was aware that being a parent changes the brain in the abstract. I was unprepared for the experience for how hard it hits. Think the stepson being only a […]

  • Ê»Oumuamua images and representation

    I ran across this image of the interstellar asteroid. It struck me that I recognize an artist’s impression as the actual representation of the object. Because we do not have an actual photo, an artist made something. And yet, to me, it IS the asteroid enough that when I see the impression photo, I think […]

  • Happiness is the truth

    Because I’m happy; Clap along if you feel like happiness is the truth I occasionally review how I am using social media. For years now, I worry about how I leverage social signaling. (read more) There is an awareness of the temptation to make myself appear more successful than I am. And that excessive signaling on […]

  • Skynet for school shooting prediction

    This sounds likely to be fraught with false positives. In particular, the language a student uses during an interview can help distinguish a high-risk teenager [shooter] from a low-risk one, according to previous research Barzman directed. That study concluded that the former was more likely to express negative feelings about himself and about the acts […]

  • The trouble with geek friends

    Geeks have intense interests. They border on obsessions. They know EVERYTHING about those interests. And argue vehemently for them, about them, and against others. These habits bleed over into other non-geek areas such that it felt like an intrinsic part of the culture. For decades I doubted you could have geeks without arguments, so I […]

  • Outraged? Don’t share

    Our attention is the product for Facebook and Twitter. They make money by selling advertising. The more time we spend on the site, the more ads they put in front of us, the more money they make. Outrage makes them the most money. We are more likely to share what outrages us. We have tribalized […]