The Social Media Evolution

The Make Me Smart Podcast episode 96: Do it for the ‘gram had an interesting quip that Instagram was what the Facebook News Feed was before it got corrupted by ads and political arguments: the trivialities of our daily lives.

Screenshot_20180704-075738_FacebookAll social networks became popular because of trivialities. “What’s on your mind?” THAT is what we want. Users flocked to them because of trivialities. We want gossip, random, and meaningless.

Corporations need to monetize somehow. Ads are how social networks try to do so. Facebook showed that targeting ads by getting numerous attributes about us is the way to make the most money on it. Tumblr, for example, has completely inane ads that only get clicked by accident because ever couple posts presented is an ad. Instagram has almost as many ads as Tumblr but the targeting of Facebook.

Tribe, Friendster, and Myspace died because users left. The triviality was lost, so there was no reason to stay. Something I find fascinating is Facebook survived several of the exodus movements. Not enough people left to kill it.

I wonder if Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, etc are capable of dying in the modern era. Will enough people leave to cause an exodus movement?

Yes, Google+ was killed, but it died because it never made it into the user consciousness. I suspect that is because Google tried to make it the cornerstone of their ecosystem. It would be like Microsoft creating a social network around Office. Productivity tools do not a social network make.

Ad Fails

An advertisement for a Porsche plug-in hybrid really fails. First, Porsche was old and lame by high school. Lotus, Lamborghini, Ferrari, and so many other car companies come ahead. Second, I do not have a job where an ostentatious car helps me. Third, I cannot keep my mobile phone properly charged. A plug-in hybrid is not the car for me.

Given how much activity I have online and all the tracking data collected about that activity, I feel that advertisements delivered to me ought to be fantastic. There should only be advertisements delivered on the pages I visit that confirm my desires or make me suddenly desire it.

Certainly looking up this car put plenty of data out there supporting the advertiser’s algorithms pushing this ad at me. Probably I will see more of it. Perhaps it is better, though, than the ads of the last item I checked out on Amazon. Reminding me that I did not buy it probably will not trick me into actually buying it.

UPDATE: Perhaps the ad had more to do with the page I visited than data about me? It was a piece critical of the Chegg IPO by comparing it Twitter as a success. I visited it because I heard a stock doubling after the IPO like Twitter’s did should be considered a failure. (The gains go to investors not Twitter, so Twitter should have set a higher price since other valued it more.)

TED Talk: Taryn Simon

My favorite quote from Taryn is, “Photography threatens fantasy.” Disney uses intricate interior design, photography, and video to construct fantasy. Advertisements, magazines, weddings, and portraits are about showing others the ideal instead of the reality. Have you seen the Dove Evolution video? (This one has music and singing by a Baha’i musician Devon Gundry.) What about the Ralph Lauren photo?

Reality bites. Hard.

(See Taryn Simon photographs secret sites on the TED site)

TED About this talk: Taryn Simon exhibits her startling take on photography — to reveal worlds and people we would never see otherwise. She shares two projects: one documents otherworldly locations typically kept secret from the public, the other involves haunting portraits of men convicted for crimes they did not commit.

Also: Taryn on Charlie Rose, Discomfort Zone (Telegraph)

Information Should Be Free

Mark Guzdial makes the point teachers add value to the learning process. Normally, I would agree. However, I got hung up on a misquote from a Walter Isaacson article How to Save Your Newspaper in TIME offering micropayments as the solution to newspapers finding a working model to survive since advertisements are not the right one.

Mark said it was “information must be free.” TIME said, “[T]he Web got caught up in the ethos that information wants to be free.” Mark correctly attributed it to Steven Levy who said, “All information should be free,” but in the context of: “Access to computers — and anything which might
teach you something about the way the world works — should be
unlimited and total.” 

Higher education provides such access. However, we hide the access behind beaucracy and tuition. Is it worth it?

Another thought on all this came from a Dorothy E. Denning quoting Richard Stallman:

I believe that all generally useful information should be free. By ‘free’ I am not referring to price, but rather to the freedom to copy the information and to adapt it to one’s own uses. … When information is generally useful, redistributing it makes humanity wealthier no matter who is distributing and no matter who is receiving.

This reminds me of the concept of Creative Commons and open source. Restrictions to information like copyright ensure the creator makes money. At the same time copyright provides some opportunities for reusing it. (CC and open source just do it better than the Copyright Office.

The DVR Trap

Recorded an episode of Psych because I know people who like it. Its okay, but I probably won’t make a season pass for it. 

Skipping past the commercials, I recognized the characters, so I stopped. Only to find myself watching a commercial featuring the show’s characters.

That is SO wrong. Smart way to catch those of us skipping past the advertisements. Guess I’ll just have to get better as skipping with the TiVo.

Cancelled

You’d think a city would make life hell on venue owners and fine advertisers for making them spend thousands of employee man hours cleaning up advertisements pasted onto walls of buildings, benches, etc. Punishment is only effective with the subject notices and can tie back to the cause-effect relationship. Tracking down, fining, and hearing appeals of “who is responsible” takes time as well. This… This is so simple its elegant!

Glasgow’s clean-up squads are tackling illegal bill posters with a little creative vandalism of their own…. the city’s litter wardens are cancelling illegal ad sites by pasting up stickers over unlicensed ads.

A few seconds with a paintbrush is enough to render the ad useless until a clean-up team arrives to tackle the site. They have already had an impact on some rogue promoters who have been inundated with complaints from music fans. People who have bought tickets to some of this summers big gigs have complained, thinking that an event, rather than the advert, had been cancelled.

The source said: “If people start phoning concert promoters complaining that they thought the gig had been cancelled, then the promoters have no-one but themselves to blame for having the posters put up in the first place.”