IPv6 Woes

Noticed one particular social media site was demonstrating slow performance. For the past week or so, it has been frustrating to use. And because it was only this one site, where I saw the issue, I figured it was them.

Slowness across all websites would indicate a problem on my end. Slowness on just one? It seems like their issue.

Only… There were no other people really complaining about their slowness. And it lasted far too long. So, I started picking at it.

I started with the Chrome DevTools and its Network tab to watch where there is slowness. It only presented in the images. The HTML, Cascade Style Sheets, and JavaScript all downloaded fast. The images were slow. And they came from a different server.

I started exploring under which circumstances they presented a problem by looking at the same content in different contexts. The breakthrough came from looking at the networking.

A traceroute to compare the main URL with the media URL were odd. The IP address for the main website came back with an IPv4 address while the media one was IPv6. The traceroute data showed the www site was relatively snappy while the media site timed out on most tests.

So, to verify the IPv6 was the problem, I went into adapter settings and turned it off. Then, I restarted the adapter. Now, the traceroute test looks fast for both addresses. And the page quickly loads.

This suggests either my ISP, router, modem, or computer have an issue with the IPv6. That is annoying, but I will just leave it off for now.

False Memories

Apparently, I never posted about my complaint that one cannot replace a compromised Social Security Number the same as you can a bank card. I was sure I had written about it.

One possibility is that I did write something, but I deleted the draft without posting. About two-thirds of what I write suffers that fate. Either I discover the idea was without merit (aka evidence contrary to what I initially thought) or the logic behind the idea too tenuous to support publishing it.

Another possibility is that I thought about writing something, but I never actually wrote it.

Who knows? Certainly not me.

Maybe I can fix the first one by leaving things in the draft state for longer? Or privately publish them with a note why I no longer claim it?

Phishing

Over a month ago, I received a creative phishing attempt. We use a relatively popular service which is mimicked fairly well. I typically receive notification emails from it by an administrative assistant. This came from another name. That was my only real clue that made me look closer. Since, I have received almost a dozen, each pretending to be a different product.

I noticed they all used different domain names for the payload link. But, they all use file.php?d=<value> or f.php?d=<value> to deliver the payload.

Computers are smarter than I am when it comes to patterns like this, so I created an email filter to look for the file names and set it loose. If I see another phishing attempt using another script name, then I will add it to the list. But, so far, I am pleased with how well it protects me from myself.

NCC-1701-D


NCC-1701-D, originally uploaded by Ezra F.

No flash lets one see the lights better than with flash.

Taken at the Star Trek: The Experience at the Hilton in Las Vegas. If you want to catch it, then you need to go by there before September 1 when it closes. 🙁

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Bored at Work?

According to Dr Eichele of Norway and Dr Stefan Debener of the UK, when the brain switches to autopilot is when we are likely to start making mistakes. The brain economizes by shifting electrical activity from the prefrontal cortex (attention) to the default mode network.

I can't want for them to figure out brains which sit in the default mode network are more likely to develop Alzheimer's or dementia. 🙂

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