Moz Outside Looking In

Yeah, this one is a royal pain. Mozilla removes support for older versions of their browser six months after the new one went into production. Open source is nimble. Proprietary companies are inflexible. Sounds like its time to go after nimble applications?

Why Mozilla still hasn’t cracked the enterprise | May 24, 2006 07:12 PM | By Matt Asay

[A] hurdle Firefox must overcome is the “heartbreakingly slow” process many enterprises go through to certify the use of a tool as critical as a Web browser, according to Baker.

Internet Elephant (in the Corner)

In the web design and web application world, Internet Explorer is always the Elephant in the Corner. The most popular web browser is one of the more cantankerous and annoying web browsers to design HTML and JavaScript for use inside it. For a long time a few web designers have preached a need for Web Standards. However, IE’s lack of standards made that unlikely. Only when IE actually move ever so slightly towards standards did the WS crowd feel vindicated.

Additionally, Internet Explorer is the gaping hole in computer security. People rarely need to patch Windows or Office so much as patch IE (and often).

Normally I roll my eyes at just about anything Dvorak writes. However, he does point out a new argument for the “No More IE” crowd. Unfortunately until Microsoft stockholders put the pressure on the company to change, I really doubt this elephant is going anywhere.

Column from PC Magazine: The Great Microsoft Blunder

I think it can now be safely said, in hindsight, that Microsoft’s entry into the browser business and its subsequent linking of the browser into the Windows operating system looks to be the worst decision—and perhaps the biggest, most costly gaffe—the company ever made. I call it the Great Microsoft Blunder.

Sniff Tests

As Dvorak points out, BitTorrent is the largest single protocol. The Web’s HTTP barely counts compared to BitTorrent and the other P2P protocols. That’s a heck of a lot of traffic—as any network administrator knows—and having it increased with crapware is not good news.

In addition, some anti-virus and anti-spyware programs don’t look at Torrents for trouble. That means even users who are bright enough to run programs like those are still in danger of having junk delivered to their computer. That’s a problem.

The real problem is that now BitTorrent, like e-mail, the Web, and soon, I’m sure, IM, is being used to deliver malware.There Is No Conspiracy Against BitTorrent

Perhaps there is a conspiracy within Microsoft to pollute every standard ever made?

Microsoft also said it had created some new extensions to the RSS format, which will be available for content publishers to use under the Creative Commons licence.
Microsoft makes web feeds easier

C’mon, people!! Your Pseduo-HTML created by people clicking on “Save as Web Page” drives people batty attempting to figure out why it does not work. Why does it not work? Because web browsers often cannot read parts. Why can they not read parts? Because it is not HTML!