2012 Reading List

I had three reading goals:

Complete unfinished novel series.

  1. A Song of Ice and Fire
    1. DONE — A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1) — George R.R. Martin
    2. DONE — A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire, #2) — George R.R. Martin
    3. DONE — A Storm of Swords (A Song of Ice and Fire, #3) — George R.R. Martin
    4. DONE — A Feast for Crows (A Song of Ice and Fire, #4) — George R.R. Martin
    5. DONE — A Dance With Dragons (A Song of Ice and Fire, #5) — George R.R. Martin
  2. Wicked Years
    1. DONE — Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West (Wicked Years, #1) — Gregory Maguire
    2. DONE — Son of a Witch (Wicked Years, #2) — Gregory Maguire
    3. NOT DONE — A Lion Among Men (Wicked Years, #3) — Gregory Maguire
  3. The Malazan Book of the Fallen
    1. DONE — Deadhouse Gates (The Malazan Book of the Fallen, #2) — Steven Erikson
    2. DONE — Memories of Ice (Malazan Book of the Fallen, #3) — Steven Erikson
    3. DONE — House of Chains (Malazan Book of the Fallen, #4) — Steven Erikson
    4. DONE — Midnight Tides (Malazan Book of the Fallen, #5) — Steven Erikson
    5. DONE — The Bonehunters (Malazan Book of the Fallen, #6) — Steven Erikson
    6. NOT DONE — Reaper’s Gale (Malazan Book of the Fallen, #7) — Steven Erikson
    7. NOT DONE — Toll the Hounds (Malazan Book of the Fallen, #8) — Steven Erikson
    8. NOT DONE — Dust of Dreams (The Malazan Book Of The Fallen #9) — Steven Erikson
    9. NOT DONE — The Crippled God (Malazan Book of the Fallen, #10) — Steven Erikson
  4. Barsoom
    1. DONE — A Princess of Mars — Edgar Rice Burroughs
    2. DONE — The Gods of Mars (Barsoom, #2) — Edgar Rice Burroughs
    3. DONE — The Warlord of Mars (Barsoom, #3) — Edgar Rice Burroughs
    4. DONE — Thuvia, Maid of Mars (Barsoom, #4) — Edgar Rice Burroughs
    5. DONE — The Chessmen of Mars (Barsoom, #5) — Edgar Rice Burroughs
    6. DONE — The Master Mind of Mars (Barsoom, #6) — Edgar Rice Burroughs
    7. DONE — A Fighting Man of Mars (Barsoom, #7) — Edgar Rice Burroughs
    8. DONE — Swords of Mars (Barsoom, #8) — Edgar Rice Burroughs
    9. DONE — Synthetic Men of Mars (Barsoom #9) — Edgar Rice Burroughs
  5. Millennium
    1. DONE — The Girl Who Played With Fire (Millennium, #2) — Stieg Larsson
    2. DONE — The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest (Millennium, #3) — Stieg Larsson
Total: 28. Done: 23. Failed.

American History and Decision Making

  1. DONE — Discover Your Inner Economist: Use Incentives to Fall in Love, Survive Your Next Meeting, and Motivate Your Dentist — Tyler Cowen
  2. DONE — The Innovator’s Dilemma: The Revolutionary Book that Will Change the Way You Do Business — Clayton M. Christensen
  3. DONE — The Innovator’s Solution: Creating and Sustaining Successful Growth — Clayton M. Christensen
  4. DONE — Our Endangered Values: America’s Moral Crisis — Jimmy Carter
  5. DONE — The Federalist Papers — Alexander HamiltonJames MadisonJohn Jay
  6. DONE — 1776 — David McCullough
  7. DONE — All the Devils are Here: The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis — Bethany McLeanJoe Nocera
  8. DONE — Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet — Jeffrey D. Sachs
  9. DONE — American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House — Jon Meacham
  10. DONE — At the Center of the Storm: My Years at the CIA — George Tenet
Total: 10. Done: 10. Completed.

Science

  1. DONE — The Genius in All of Us: Why Everything You’ve Been Told About Genetics, Talent and IQ is Wrong — David Shenk
  2. DONE — The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2010 — Freeman DysonTim Folger
  3. DONE — The Theory of Everything: The Origin and Fate of the Universe — Stephen Hawking
  4. DONE — The Nature of Technology: What It Is and How It Evolves — W. Brian Arthur
  5. DONE — The Demise of Guys: Why Boys Are Struggling and What We Can Do About It  — Philip ZimbardoNikita Duncan
  6. DONE — Mind Wide Open: Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life — Steven Johnson
  7. DONE — NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children — Po BronsonAshley Merryman
  8. DONE — The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World — Michael Pollan
  9. DONE — The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement — David Brooks
  10. DONE — What We Believe But Cannot Prove: Today’s Leading Thinkers on Science in the Age of Certainty — John Brockman
  11. DONE — The Cosmic Landscape: String Theory and the Illusion of Intelligent Design — Leonard Susskind
  12. DONE — A Different Universe: Reinventing Physics from the Bottom Down — Robert B. Laughlin
  13. DONE — Being Logical: A Guide to Good Thinking — D.Q. McInerny
Total: 13. Done: 13. Completed.

Not Your Oprah’s Book Club (FacebookGoodreads) selections:
(Facebook page for Athens book club)

  1. DONE — The House of Mirth — Edith Wharton
  2. DONE — Love is a Mix Tape — Rob Sheffield

Re-read to watch the movie:

  1. DONE — The Hobbit — 
  2. DONE   — 

Offlist:

  1. DONE — The Picture of Dorian Gray — Oscar Wilde
  2. DONE — Ubik — 
  3. DONE  Free Will — Sam Harris
  4. DONE  Free Will: A Response to Sam Harris  Kurt Keefner
  5. DONE — The Three Musketeers — Alexandre Dumas

Stories

Those who enjoy thinking are mentioned at the end of this quote from Why Stories Sell: Transportation Leads to Persuasion as most vulnerable to being persuaded by a story. Reading Oscar Wilde is fun if only because he puts in so many entertaining quips from his characters to comment and persuade the reader. I feel transported back to college where my friends were challenging my ability to keep up with the craziness of who did what, when, how to who.

Stories work so well to persuade us because, if they’re well told, we get swept up in them, we are transported inside them.

Transportation is key to why they work. Once inside the story we are less likely to notice things which don’t match up with our everyday experience.

For example an aspirational Hollywood movie with a can-do spirit might convince us that we can tackle any problem, despite what we know about how the real world works.

Also, when concentrating on a story people are less aware that they are subject to a persuasion attempt: the message get in under the radar.

Two sorts of people who may be particularly susceptible to being persuaded by stories are those who seek out emotional situations and those who enjoy thinking (Thompson & Haddock, 2011).

Drew Westen at Emory University has a good New York Times piece on how President Obama failed to keep up the grand story he built transporting people into building a better America during the campaign. He needs to resume telling it or start a new one to convince the American public he should be elected for a second term.