Once Through the Firewall

Sites like eMessenger are often very useful. I once memorized the URLs to AOL’s and and Yahoo’s web-based IM clients. When I started keeping my bookmarks online that made it easier. Occasionally I have found myself needing to chat without being able to start up a client. For instance, going off to a training or workshop somewhere with limited a wireless network. The HTTP port (for the web) is so ubiquitous that no one would block it. Which means services like this would work.

eMessenger

What is e-Messenger? e-Messenger is a web application that enables you to chat with your MSN, AOL and Yahoo buddies without having to install any program or Java applet. All you need is a JavaScript enabled browser and you’re set to go and use e-Messenger, even if you’re behind a firewall.

Once Through the Firewall

Sites like this are often very useful. I once memorized the URLs to AOL’s and and Yahoo’s web-based IM clients. When I started keeping my bookmarks online that made it easier. Occasionally I have found myself needing to chat without being able to start up a client. For instance, going off to a training or workshop somewhere with limited a wireless network. The HTTP port (for the web) is so ubiquitous that no one would block it. Which means services like this would work.

eMessenger

What is e-Messenger? e-Messenger is a web application that enables you to chat with your MSN, AOL and Yahoo buddies without having to install any program or Java applet. All you need is a JavaScript enabled browser and you’re set to go and use e-Messenger, even if you’re behind a firewall.

10 Types of People



10 Types of People, originally uploaded by sneezypb.

“There are 10 types of people in the world; those who understand binary and those who don’t.”

Its nice to have a Mom who encourages my geekliness. 🙂

UFO Seeker Hacker

Poor guy. I am curious about how people come up with the figures they do about how much damage a hacker caused. My guess is whatever they spend to fix the problem. So… holes in computers they should have patched by didn’t or software they should have purchased but didn’t until the hacker caused the issue become damages.

I was just hunting UFOs, says Pentagon hacker – Computerworld

To the U.S., he is a seriously dangerous man who put the nation’s security at risk by committing “the biggest military computer hack of all time.”

But Briton Gary McKinnon says he’s just an ordinary computer nerd who wanted to find out whether aliens and UFOs exist.

During his two-year quest, McKinnon broke into computers at the Pentagon, NASA and the Johnson Space Center, as well as systems used by the U.S. Army, Navy and Air Force.

“I had seen the film War Games, and I do remember clearly thinking at the time, that’s amazing — a great big
military computer system and a young, spotty teenager,” the soft-spoken 39-year-old told Reuters in an interview.

The next stage of his legal battle takes place on May 10. But he hints that whatever happens, he has a lot more to tell.

“I can’t talk about a lot of stuff that I found. It’s just not the right time,” he said with a smile.

Internet Elephant (in the Corner)

In the web design and web application world, Internet Explorer is always the Elephant in the Corner. The most popular web browser is one of the more cantankerous and annoying web browsers to design HTML and JavaScript for use inside it. For a long time a few web designers have preached a need for Web Standards. However, IE’s lack of standards made that unlikely. Only when IE actually move ever so slightly towards standards did the WS crowd feel vindicated.

Additionally, Internet Explorer is the gaping hole in computer security. People rarely need to patch Windows or Office so much as patch IE (and often).

Normally I roll my eyes at just about anything Dvorak writes. However, he does point out a new argument for the “No More IE” crowd. Unfortunately until Microsoft stockholders put the pressure on the company to change, I really doubt this elephant is going anywhere.

Column from PC Magazine: The Great Microsoft Blunder

I think it can now be safely said, in hindsight, that Microsoft’s entry into the browser business and its subsequent linking of the browser into the Windows operating system looks to be the worst decision—and perhaps the biggest, most costly gaffe—the company ever made. I call it the Great Microsoft Blunder.

Company Culture

In this article, Rands describes the building of a company culture in getting a software product to 1.0. Company culture has become a topic of interest to me lately. In taking a new job in a place with a very different mindset, I want to better understand my component in this machine.

Thoughts in my head:

  • Change is good and bad. Depending on whether you pick a good or bad or ambivalent route you get different results.
  • Adapt or die.
  • Personal preference colors choice.

Rands In Repose: 1.0

In thinking about the difficulties of 1.0, I realized that Maslow’s [Hierarchy of Needs] model fundamentally applied to shipping the first version of a product. There’s a hierarchy that defines what you need to build in order to ship 1.0 and it sort’f looks like this.