RE 2007: USG Digital Content Repositories: Resources to Share

Digital Library of Georgia

  • 60 different libraries and content providers
  • digitizing content, available in various browsing and search options
  • really impressive
  • historical record widely dispersed


Civil Rights Digital Library

  • 65 institutions
  • web access to 25 hours of news photage.

Alternative Media Access Center

  • Some publishers 9 times out of 10 provide an electronic copy. In cases where they do not offer electronic texts (not just an image) or audio recoding. Pick up where these companies have failed students. Publisher lobbying group resists providing electronic texts. Harvard Law Review has blue book distributed by a non-disabled individual to friends causing the loss of thousands of dollars in revenue.
  • Handle 2,000 books a term. Service 109 institutions. Focus on Georgia and may expand to Tennessee, South Carolina, etc. Serve 191 students, but students often unaware as K-12 provides automatically whereas higher education does not.
  • A place that uses guillotines cannot help but be AWESOMEness defined.

Digital Innovation Group

  • iPod Day
  • Representatives at each campus


USG SHARE

  • Learning Edge – Quella?
  • Uses Creative Commons 2.0
  • Federated searching – Google, MERLOT, or Orange Grove
  • Each campus has a contact for providing access, training,
  • MERLOT refers individuals to the content. USG SHARE has the content.
  • Intent to do provide seamless access through GeorgiaVIEW.

RE 2007: Administering Sakai

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  • Timeline:
    • Oct 2006: Faculty committee selected Sakai over Blackboard Vista
    • Jan 2007: Developed a roll-out plan.
    • Jun 2007: Pilot
    • Aug 2007: Production
    • Still: Some classes still running on CE4.1, being phased out of use.
  • Needs – no more than 5% of code custom written by GA Tech or professional services.
    • Integration with Banner.
    • Grade book
    • Assignments – no resubmit. Professor had built a section aggregation tool which combined with assignments started killing the servers. Ate all the database connections. Dead in the water Monday afternoon to noon on Tuesday until a code change was implemented.
    • Assessments
    • Course lists would not show unpublished sections. Students were concerned registration failed to take place. Wrote a “More” link to show students the course exists but not yet available.
  • t-square
    • GA Tech – 30,000 users and 10,000 sections. 16,000 users login.
  • Sakai out of the box not very good.
    • Java Server on Tomcat.
    • User administration sux. No way to see what classs a student is taking without an outside application. Created an administrative console, available to machine room admins. Monitors services, processes. Admin console Perl connecting to APIs.
    • Admin role can access every course. Built in admin console to link directly to courses to go help troubleshoot.
  • Unicon – professional services
    • Built t-square implementation.
    • Created some tools.
  • Staffing
    • Systems – OS and hardware – 1 person
    • Application support – 1 person
    • Code developers, Quality Assurance – 3 people
    • Database Administrator – 0.5 people (spends part of time on other projects)
    • Instructional technologists – 2 people
  • Why Sakai? Faculty hate WebCT. Possibilities of integration (aren’t there possibilities for this with Blackboard?).
  • Costs – refused to say. Rumor is 2x our costs for making available for 200,000 students for Blackboard.

Kinda weird. Suggested it was nigh impossible to create accounts except through Banner in WebCT CE. Except the same APIs which create Banner accounts can create guest accounts?

RE 2007: Birds of a Feather: Luminis

Kathy Kral, University of West Georgia

  • Luminis IV CPIP connector: Clayton, Augusta, West GA.
  • Issues with IMS when allowing IMAP from outside the Luminis application? VSU no issues with IMAP and POP allowed outside. Augusta initially restricted but opened up access without advertisement. Mention on one of email lists Blackberries fail to do a close with connection resulting in stale sessions accumulating.
  • Mailbox sizes: West GA 10MB, Augusta 40MB for students and 125MB for faculty, Valdosta 250MB.
  • Makarand Kulkarani, Sungard – Created a replacement so mailbox is Gmail. This is a professional service engagement. Engagements start at 90 hours with unused hours un-billed. When GCF connectors are built Training similar, typically 48 hours.
  • Name changes are a pita.

Jesse Lyman built a Luminis to Vista 4 single-sign on connector to handle multiple institutions.

RE 2007: Top Ten Disruptive Trends

Rock Eagle 2007

Keynote – David Cearley, Gartner

Way too many unfamiliar acronyms an terminology. It moved really fast without spending much time to explain anything.

Disruptive trends selected by timing, speed, and likelihood.

  1. Multricore to fabric – Core on processors will double every two years through 2015. Applications will have to adapt to multi-cores. Software licensing around cores, influences purchasing. Sets the stage for hybrid systems where power core and cell processor cores integrated. 3D chip (cube of cores) is coming. Next evolution in blade technology is to have shared memory. Fabric allows dynamic allocation and partioning of memory and processors and I/O for servers.
  2. Tera-Archicture Compute Element – Self-assembling and self-managing applications.
  3. Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) – Developers will create modularized applications for a dynamic, flexible environment. They will need new tools, training, vizualization. Way platforms are built change. Vendors will not off the components, instead, we will need to create these ourselves. Pervasive… It will hit every level of the enterprise.
  4. Open Source – Development tools, Application Servers, Security, Operating Systems currently hold the most maturity. It will have viable alternatives for 80% of software choices.
  5. Web 2.0 – Biggest disruption over next 10 years as it has been the last 10 years. Web 2-.0 – applications built on web tech and design prin that may exploit community based development and social networking and/or new web-based business models. Long-term journey for increasing community, business involvement. Web Oriented Architecture = SOA + WWW+ REST. WOA replaces complex public API calls in current SOA model in favor in simple interfaces.
    1. Mashups – Composite applications on the web. Classic portal model built complex APIs. Mashups use WOA using RSS and Atom to provide feeds of info. Typically used in simple, high value applications.
    2. Web Platform – Everything as a service. Service providers offering infrastructure. Google and IBM offering a service to universities to build applications using the Googleplex infrastructure and IBM support.
    3. Symantic Web – Microformats – Simple way offering metadata.
  6. Social software – RS, podcasts, folksonomies, blogs, wiki, social bookmarks, content rating, prediction parket, taste sharing, social networks. The Participatory Web. Threadless makes user designed teeshirts sold back to users. How can we create communities and harness the power of the collective. Start with a purpose. Nuture the community. Open socially mediated spaces work better than technically managed systems. Have a tipping point plan.
  7. Netowrk Virtual Worlds – Games – People are 3D, have a profound impact on people.
  8. Displays – UIs are changing.
  9. Video – Counterfeit reality – how are you sure video has not changed?