Crowdsourcing

I am glad industries outside the computer-related realm are picking up what open source has known for a long time: Value can come from those who have not had to go through a job interview process to attach to a project. The power of the Internet is to facilitate communication.

Wired 14.06: The Rise of Crowdsourcing

Hobbyists, part-timers, and dabblers suddenly have a market for their efforts, as smart companies in industries as disparate as pharmaceuticals and television discover ways to tap the latent talent of the crowd. The labor isn’t always free, but it costs a lot less than paying traditional employees. It’s not outsourcing; it’s crowdsourcing.

Reality TV perhaps is the one example which made a half-hearted effort. Instead of professional actors, get people off the street. However, the writers have contrived to pick casts that interact through conflict. When the actors succeed it is in despite of the producers.

The specific example of this is stock photography. I didn’t read past the first page of four. Hopefully they get into Creative Commons and free stock photography?

Moz Outside Looking In

Yeah, this one is a royal pain. Mozilla removes support for older versions of their browser six months after the new one went into production. Open source is nimble. Proprietary companies are inflexible. Sounds like its time to go after nimble applications?

Why Mozilla still hasn’t cracked the enterprise | May 24, 2006 07:12 PM | By Matt Asay

[A] hurdle Firefox must overcome is the “heartbreakingly slow” process many enterprises go through to certify the use of a tool as critical as a Web browser, according to Baker.