Diebold is back in the news. Poor company. Not a good week for sure.


First, some of the software on machines was not certified for elections. This is the sentence that nails them hard. “The audit uncovered discrepancies between what Diebold said was installed in counties and what auditors actually found.” Some of it is undoubtedly the county’s fault. They should know what is installed in every machiine, who touched it when for what, and other pertinent information. Scary indeed.


Second, ex-cons run a subsidiary? How far should a company go to make sure something his air tight? Hiring programmers to write vote counting code internally and doing background checks on those people is one thing.  Doing background checks on programmers that formerly worked for a company before acquiring them is probably over the top.


The legislation could potentially be joke. Anyone hired to work for a voting software company has to go through  background check. Say a company writes a piece of software to work for another industry. They realized they are not able to sell it in that market, but maybe a voting software company would be interested? Do they do background checks and fire anyone who fails?

Diebold

Diebold is back in the news. Poor company. Not a good week for sure.

First, some of the software on machines was not certified for elections. This is the sentence that nails them hard. “The audit uncovered discrepancies between what Diebold said was installed in counties and what auditors actually found.” Some of it is undoubtedly the county’s fault. They should know what is installed in every machiine, who touched it when for what, and other pertinent information. Scary indeed.

Second, ex-cons run a subsidiary? How far should a company go to make sure something his air tight? Hiring programmers to write vote counting code internally and doing background checks on those people is one thing.  Doing background checks on programmers that formerly worked for a company before acquiring them is probably over the top.

The legislation could potentially be joke. Anyone hired to work for a voting software company has to go through  background check. Say a company writes a piece of software to work for another industry. They realized they are not able to sell it in that market, but maybe a voting software company would be interested? Do they do background checks and fire anyone who fails?

CAN-SPAM Act

Spam, hacking, and identity theft is the worst it has ever been. Next year might be even worse. Hurrah? 
Despite the CAN-SPAM Act, I really do not foresee so significant a decrease in spam that I will not be bothered by getting so much of it. For one, a company could produce a log which shows that someone provided “affirmative consent” (aka Opt-In) for the email address. As tricky as they spammers are, I would expect them to forge it. Better is Double-Opt-In where a confirmation is sent to the email address and confirmed. Most of the spam I get claims they have my permission from Opt-In.
New vulnerabilities are always being found in Windows. As the popularity of Linux has increased, they are being found there. My Mac has me install security updates almost as frequently as Windows. No where is safe, except in a hole with no connection to the Internet. At least until the Special Forces, Secret Service, or ATF arrive (after all, why would not be connected to the Internet unless you have something criminal to hide).
Don’t think people take identity theft seriously enough yet.
Each transaction requires you to share personal information…

(source)

Yeah, each and every. Every check, debit, credit, or non-cash transaction you make exposes you. Cash is safe, I guess. Having a bank account, working for someone, or even having  driver’s license exposes you to risk.

Spam, hacking, and identity theft is the worst it has ever been. Next year might be even worse. Hurrah?

 

Despite the CAN-SPAM Act, I really do not forsee so significant a decrease in spam that I will not be bothered by getting so much of it. For one, a company could produce a log which shows that someone provided “affirmative consent” (aka Opt-In) for the email address. As tricky as they spammers are, I would expect them to forge it. Better is Double-Opt-In where a confirmation is sent to the email address and confirmed. Most of the spam I get claims they have my permission from Opt-In.

 

New vulnerabilities are always being found in Windows. As the popularity of Linux has increased, they are being found there. My Mac has me install security updates almost as frequently as Windows. No where is safe, except in a hole with no connection to the Internet. At least until the Special Forces, Secret Service, or ATF arrive (after all, why would not be connected to the Internet unless you have something criminal to hide).

 

Don’t think people take identity theft seriously enough yet.


Each transaction requires you to share personal information…
(source)

Yeah, each and every. Every check, debit, credit, or non-cash transaction you make exposes you. Cash is safe, I guess. Having a bank account, working for someone, or even having  driver’s license exposes you to risk.